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Which SEL model(s)?

VI.  How does one decide which SEL model(s) to use?

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☞  With which SEL* models are you already familiar?

* SEL = Social and emotional learning

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We start our focus here on SEL models with which we at Logo-BCS are most familiar.

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There are stories behind each of the SEL models with which we are most familiar, in each case affected by our STEM* influenced understanding of human performance.

* STEM = Science, technology, engineering, and mathematical findings

Right off the bat we confess our favorite model is The Leader in Me program, not only because of its evidence-based breadth and depth, but also because the program is based on a model that closely matches our own working model of the human Central Nervous System.

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We categorize SEL models three ways:

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1) Presence of a prominent focus on the how and why of TEACHER PEACE OF MIND in the classroom

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STEM findings suggest that we each will operate at our personal best, with optimal sustainability, when we pro-actively and regularly invest in our own “mindful” peace of mind.

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☞ Well-grounded peace of mind is particularly advantageous

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when things are going well and you are “in flow

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and when difficult and unexpected stress arises,

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to better enable you to make more effective choices.

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2) Presence of PUBLISHED SCHOOL-WIDE EVIDENCE, in addition to classroom-based evidence

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At Logo-BCS, our primary focus is empowering SCHOOL-WIDE PERFORMANCE because of the synergism — internal and external and among systems — leading to superior performance.

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3) Do the roots of the SEL model include an explicit focus on CONFLICT AS A CONSTRUCTIVE OPPORTUNITY in that learning community?

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My (Dr. J’s) introduction to SEL was super-charged through my own 1984 participation in the American Friends Service Committee’s “Alternatives to Violence” workshop at the Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio.

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My own supervised and sustained professional experiences in many high-conflict civic settings and in multi-disciplinary analyses across many years, clearly indicate to me that:

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☞ Effective conflict resolution skills are learned skills.

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☞ Children and adults can learn to utilize age-appropriate conflict resolution skills effectively.

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DukeItOut

☞ Unskilled conflict resolution parties will more readily enter a “fight or flight” state of mind than will skilled conflict resolution parties.

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☞ Non-attachment to, yet willingness to enter into conflicts constructively, with proper training and experience, can lead to enhanced learning, innovation, and appreciation of options and of each other.

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☞ “Conflict as opportunity” represents a definable philosophy of constructive inclusion rather than avoidance of conflicts with others, viewing conflict as natural, normal, and potentially productive on behalf of effective innovation with buy-in among stakeholders.

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☛ Effective conflict resolution skills naturally lead to more mutually satisfying and enduring outcomes.

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☛ Social-emotional learning combined with academic skills will empower more effective conflict resolution outcomes.

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☛ Cultural differences can complicate matters, especially among unskilled parties.

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☛ People, especially as they age beyond adolescence, will often try to avoid conflicts, because conflicts directly addressed can lead to uncomfortable feelings including anxiety about what might happen, including unpredictability.

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☛ Habitual avoidance of conflicts leads to loss of important personal learning opportunities.

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☛ “Conflict as opportunity” represents an integral dimension of SEL programming that is best made explicit to everyone’s advantage.

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♥    ♣    ♦    ♠

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The following list is not to be considered exhaustive.

These are the SEL models with which we at Logo-BCSare most familiar.

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A listing in more than one column represents relevance to more than one of our three categories of SEL programs.

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Next are SEL models about which we at Business Culture Solutions are open to learning about, especially within a context of our primary interest.

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For additional information about specific SEL programs, the following on-line resources are recommended:

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2013 CASEL Guide: Effective Social and Emotional Learning Programs –Preschool and Elementary School Edition

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2015 CASEL Guide: Effective Social and Emotional Learning Programs—Middle and High School Edition

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If you have questions about what you are learning and would like to bounce those questions off of us, we welcome your contact.

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