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Negative Sides of Teaching

II. Negative Sides of Teaching

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Negative sides of teaching, for students, has already been well-documented.

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Negative Sides of Teaching — for Teachers

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Many aspects of the teaching day can potentially frustrate any given teacher.

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This is natural, given increasingly complex and continuously changing public school performance settings and standards, amidst additional changes that are:

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Informational

Technological

Social.

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Opportunities for informational, technical, and social performance glitches abound for most teachers on a daily basis.

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Frustrations can occur staff-to-staff as well as staff-to-students.

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The teaching career drop-out rate, with disillusionment, is a real phenomenon.

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Not every teacher successfully makes the transition to a long-term, satisfying teaching career.

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Changes in education are multifaceted, simultaneous, and unrelenting.

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Many changes are happening with increasing speed.

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PerplexedPersonWhat are the impacts of these continuous and multi-faceted changes upon teachers?

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Teachers’ can experience school day frustrations on any given day as deriving from any of several sources:

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(From more “simple” to increasingly complex…)

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1) Self

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  • Personal and family medical and financial challenges are often the most obvious personal distractions from work.  Interestingly, unplanned legal frustrations can “silently” top the list as the real reason for taking off work.

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2) One’s own classroom environment

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  • One’s own class setting can be insufficient or unreliable as a resource for both teaching and learning.

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3) Apathetic, non-compliant, or disruptive students

DisruptiveApatheticStudentsDisengagedApatheticStudents

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In addition, local communities have their own idiosyncratic blends of community and student sub-cultures with which educators must work.

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4) Poor school “climate” surrounding the classroom, that could include:

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  •  re-occurring glitches in teaching resources accessibility, teamwork, and management

  •  re-occurring glitches in school technologies or facilities maintenance

  •  re-occurring disruptions by other teachers’ students

  •  blowback from other frustrated school personnel or stakeholders

  •  seemingly non-supportive administrators

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☞ When the 2nd and especially the 4th item, above, tops their list, the most capable teachers often set about finding themselves a new school.

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  • Struggling schools (which by some standards can be majority of public schools today) thereby lose capable teachers.

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When the third item, above, tops their list, teachers want help with “SEL” from their school administrators and from their profession. 

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  • Individual efforts, especially with peer support, are fine, and a great place to begin (see section VI in preceding Classroom Solutions page).

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  School-wide support, starting with the principal and including all staff, to constructively focus on desired SEL behaviors, provides far superior results. 

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These superior results include finding solutions to problems # 2, 3, and 4, above, simultaneously.

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> > Return to Classroom Solutions page.

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